Posts Tagged smoking

Smoking and COPD – We Can Help

January 7th, 2015 | Author: Katelyn Turner

The Centers for Disease Control today reported that close to half of U.S. adults over 40 who live with asthma or COPD still continue to smoke. The information follows a recent CDC report which found that 15 percent of Americans between 40 and 79 years of age suffer from an obstruction of the lungs, such as COPD. The study concluded that 46 percent of adults between the ages of 40 and 79 with COPD currently smoked, with the statistic rising to 55 percent of individuals with “moderate or worse” levels of the disease.

[http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db181.htm]

[http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db181.htm]

Researchers found that rates of smoking for individuals with COPD and similar diseases more than doubled that of people who do not live with such illnesses.

“Cigarette smoking is the most important, but not the only, risk factor for COPD in the United States. The single most important intervention a smoker with COPD can do is to stop smoking. However, COPD often progresses in patients long after they have stopped smoking, and up to 25% of people with evidence of COPD have never smoked. The COPD Foundation continues to pursue better strategies to prevent, treat, and some day, cure, COPD,” said David M. Mannino, M.D., member of the COPD Foundation’s Board of Directors and Professor at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health.

The COPD Foundation is committed to assisting those who live with COPD and their efforts to quit smoking. The Foundation recognizes the various challenges our community members face and offers peer-to-peer support for those who wish to quit. If you live with COPD and would like to speak with someone directly about your options, please call our C.O.P.D. Information Line at 1-866-316-2673, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. EST. You may also visit www.COPD360social.org for online peer support.

For more information about smoking cessation, please visit the COPD Foundation website here.

Read the full CDC report here.

E-Cig Poisonings are on the Rise

April 7th, 2014 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

There is a lot of debate surrounding  the use of electronic cigarettes. In 2007, the electronic cigarette or “e-cig” was introduced and has since been celebrated by smokers as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes. Unlike traditional tobacco, e-cigs vaporize liquid nicotine, which eliminates the inhalation of tar and other carcinogens.

p0403-e-cigarette-poison

(taken from cdc.gov)

Sound like a healthier option? Many say ‘yes,’ but health experts disagree. Officials believe e-cigarettes not only pose serious risks to smokers, but others in their homes as well – particularly children. This week, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)  reported a dramatic increase in e-cig poisonings. According to the report, calls to poison control centers have sky-rocketed from one call in September 2010, to over 200 calls in February 2014.  Approximately half of the calls involved children under 5, and about 40 percent were in adults over 20 years of age.

calls for e-cigarettes have been steadily increasing – from one call in September 2010 to over 200 in February 2014. The study found that calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette exposures were more likely to result in “an adverse health effect” compared to cigarette exposure calls – highlighting the toxic potency of these e-liquids. – See more at: http://www.copdfoundation.org/About-Us/Press-Room/Press-Releases/ID/245/E-Cigarette-Poisoning-Cases-on-the-Rise.aspx#sthash.UnSzufbR.dpuf

Experts hold that these statistics indicate an emerging public health concern caused by a product that is not regulated by the FDA.

“The e-cigarette industry specifically targets children and teens with appealing flavors like cotton candy and gummy bear, and neither these products nor their liquid nicotine refills are currently regulated by the federal government,” American Academy of Pediatrics president James M. Perrin, MD.

Do you think electronic cigarettes should be regulated? Are they generally helpful or harmful? Share with us below.

Shaming and Blaming

March 7th, 2014 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

The dreaded question for individuals living with COPD is “Did you smoke?” So much is insinuated in three simple words, and so many in our community have to withstand the stigma associated with the disease.  All too often, people with COPD are afraid to reach out for help, let alone raise awareness for the disease, because they believe in the end they will be shamed and blamed for smoking.

Smoking does cause 75% of COPD – but did you know that 25% of COPD patients have never smoked? Environmental,

(taken from Pinterest.com)

(taken from Pinterest.com)

occupational, and genetic factors also cause respiratory diseases.  If you did or do smoke however, know that you are not alone. If you feel stigmatized for your condition, just reach out to our COPD community on Facebook or call the C.O.P.D. Information Line at 1 866 316 2673. What is important now is not to look at the past with regret and shame, but to the future with strength and hope. No one has the right to take that away from you.

This leads me to a piece of news that broke this week. Online news site, Mail Online, reported that late actress Shirley Temple Black was, “…a secret smoker who died from lung disease.” When she passed last month, her family did not disclose COPD as the cause of death, perhaps out of fear that she might be stigmatized for smoking.

This is just one example of an individual who had to live in silence about a disease that is the third leading cause of death in the United States. We hope those living with COPD today will come out of the shadows and help educate others about the nature of the disease. We believe the “shame and blame” culture will decline over time with greater awareness and education about the disease.

We are proud of all of our community members who speak out about COPD, and have the courage to stand up to those who may judge and marginalize us.

Have you been “shamed and blamed” for developing COPD? How did you deal with it? Please share in the comments section.

 

CVS Quits: Retailer Bans Cigarettes

February 5th, 2014 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

CVS/pharmacy announced today that it will remove cigarettes and all tobacco products from its shelves in all 76,000 stores nationwide starting October 1, 2014.  Executives believe the distribution of tobacco products is inconsistent with their mission to promote health.  CVS will be the first national pharmacy chain to ban cigarette sales.

“When we asked ourselves where we expect to be in the future as a healthcare company, it became clear that removing tobacco products from our stores was the right thing to do,” CVS President and CEO Larry Merlo said in the recorded statement below.

 

The response on social media has been astounding, making #CVSquits a trending topic today.  Many individuals online celebrate the policy change, while others argue it will not impact the rate of smoking, boosting sales at other outlets.

According to statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 43.8 million people, or 19 percent of all adults, smoke cigarettes. Smoking remains the leading cause of COPD.  The COPD Foundation congratulates CVS for its commitment to health care and putting people before profits.

What do you think of the ban?  Do you think it will discourage smokers from lighting up, or prevent others from starting the habit?  Share with us below.

50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking

January 17th, 2014 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health.  A press conference was held at the White House this morning to commemorate decades of anti-smoking efforts with the release of the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking. Keynote speakers included Dept. of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, HHS Assistant Secretary Dr. Howard Koh, and the U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Boris Lushniak.

Past successes, current challenges, and alarming statistics were presented during this morning’s conference. Sec. Sebelius reflected on past campaigns, namely Tips from Former Smokers, and congratulated advocates for their achievements in shifting societal norms and enlightening Americans about the dangers of smoking. Since 1964, the anti-tobacco community has succeeded in driving smoking out of airplanes, many restaurants, colleges, etc., and the Tips campaign alone reported helping over 100,000 individuals quit smoking. Despite these accomplishments, Sec. Sebelius acknowledged that the U.S. is still very much addicted to tobacco.

In his speech, Dr. Lushniak repeated the phrase, “Enough is enough!” and stated that since the first Surgeon General’s report in1964:

  • Over 20 million premature deaths could be attributed to cigarette smoking.
  • Smoking has been linked to diseases of nearly all organs, to diminished health status, &  harm to the fetus.
  • Smoking risks for women have risen sharply & women are now as likely to die from smoking as men.
  • Compared to men, women are as likely to die from smoking & more die from chronic lung disease.
  • Smoking is now known to cause 13 different types of cancer. In 1964 officials could only be sure about lung cancer in men.
  • The smoking rate is down to 18%, from 42%.
  • Smokers have a greater risk of developing lung cancer, even though they smoke fewer cigarettes.
  • The annual costs to the nation from smoking are approaching $300 billion.

So much has been done over the past 50 years, but there is still much work to do to make the next generation tobacco-free. Please visit the Surgeon General’s website for more information.

This video features Tips ad participants Terrie Hall, Brandon Carmichael and Roosevelt Smith, discussing their experiences during and after the Tips campaign.

Statistics Show COPD on the Rise in Women

June 7th, 2013 | Author: Sheela Cao

Women are now 37 percent more likely than men to suffer from COPD Read more…

Add Years to Your Life – Ditch the Cigarettes!

January 31st, 2013 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

The Washington Post recently reported about a milestone study addressing the ills related to smoking. Read more…

No Smoking at Daytona International Speedway

July 9th, 2012 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

Back in February, NASCAR announced a smoking ban at the Daytona International Speedway Read more…

Two Peas in a Pod

February 17th, 2012 | Author: Janina Kowalski

A Mother’s struggle with COPD teaches her daughter perseverance Read more…

The Great American Smokeout

November 17th, 2011 | Author: Fabiana Talbot

Today the American Cancer Society is spearheading “The Great American Smokeout,” Read more…